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Annotated Bibliography:
Human Resources Development

Bundy, Robert. "Changing role of human resources has vast implications." Wichita Business Journal, Wichita: July 11,1997.
In the past decade American companies have tried every way to get and keep their competitive advantage. But now managers are finding that human resource management is the way in which to stay competitive. They are finding that employees are their most valuable assets and that with this asset; the more time and effort spend on them, the greater the return. In a rapidly changing landscape and because of a growing demand to better serve customers, human resource management is gaining more popularity. Having effective human resource management results when you have the right people doing the right things at the right time to drive the organization's performance to its optimal capacity.

Dow, Warren. "Consultants: the Rodney Dangerfields of the Nonprofit World." (2000) http://www.charityvillage.com/charityvillage/research/rom8.html
This article is about the use of consultants in nonprofit organizations. It clearly points out how unpopular this strategy can be. Dr. Dow begins this article by citing a case about the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra. The symphony was losing a large amount of money. The people who were underwriting them began to get concerned, suspended their funding, and launched two independent studies from two completely impartial consultant groups. The two consulting groups did their jobs by pointing out how management had failed the WSO and suggesting solutions to the problems. The information was leaked to the press and a story was written in such a way that it appeared that the first consultant report was a complete waste of money since everything they found had already been noted in the organization's minutes. In another story it was mentioned that there was a second report that listed many suggestions on how to solve the problems. However, the second consulting group was also discredited when the article said they had no stake in the WSO leaving the impression that time was being wasted and consultants were also an overpriced waste. Dr. Dow points out that this was not a true representation of the consulting firms' value. He noted that both firms were located outside of the organization and that was positive, giving the consultants "objectivity, impartiality, confidentiality and new ways of doing things." Though the use of consultants may not be the most popular solution, hiring an outside firm may be the right way to look at how your human resources are being used, then figuring out the solution of how to best utilize that function.

Ellis, Susan J. "How do I Staff Our Volunteer Program?" Excerpted from: From the Top Down: The Executive Role in Volunteer Program, (1996). http://www.genie.org Volunteer Management FAQ #3.
This article looks into the process by which an organization may find the right person to manage a volunteer program within their company. It points out that most people who direct a volunteer program do so only as a part time job. This means that this job does not get their complete attention. They will usually spend whatever time they can on the volunteer program while continuing to concentrate on their primary jobs. One solution to this problem is to find funding for a part time staff member to manage the volunteer program. This will increase the feeling of responsibility because the part-time staff member is getting paid. Delegating the responsibility to an existing staff member is not a successful way to get the position filled because that generates the attitude, "I didn't ask for this responsibility." The best solution seems to be hiring a new part time employee for this specific task. One must take into account the possibility of expanding the hours of this job and when the expansion will be "capped." The article gives good insight into the many questions the organization must ask itself before appointing the responsibility of managing volunteers.

Felder, Lanny. "Human resource, facility managers must cooperate." Baltimore Business Journal, Baltimore: March 7, 1997.
This article about how human resource management designs a response to how an organization needs to develop certain skills and technologies. The workplace is a complex environment dealing with people, technology, and services. They must be carefully integrated to yield productive and efficient operations. One of the key functions in running an efficient operation is information on an employee's position, function, equipment requirements, office location, and telephone extension. Also, employees (temporary or permanent) should be trained on how to use various office equipment and software. The integration of these characteristics is essential for good human resource management.

Gassler, Robert Scott. The economics of nonprofit enterprise, University.
The Human Resource Department should guide and direct the employees of NPOs towards high morale behavior and productive outcomes. The development of NPOs human resource must provide direction and grow based upon the size and growth of the NPO. A human resource department can expand successfully by supporting employees and providing benefits through a responsive structure.

Lord, Richard. The nonprofit problem solver, Praeger, 1989.
The role of the human resource department is to develop programs that are charged with supporting the people in an organization so that performance and affectivity is maximized. Developing a human resource department within an organization can be difficult. One must keep in touch with the feeling of the employees to determine what needs the human resource department can affect. The human resource department, itself, must be assessed and restructured to remain relevant as the organization changes and grows. All of this must be done within the context of the mission statement of the organization. The organization must keep the employees content while directing them in the direction of mission fulfillment.

Mason, David E. Voluntary nonprofit enterprise management, Plenum Press, 1984.
A key idea in human resources management is to support and direct management's relations with paid and voluntary employees. The development of an organization's human resources has to be directed towards the development of a program that will support the people of the organization. Programs should provide the people within the organization an opportunity to perform at their most effective level. Paid and volunteer employees alike often feel frustrated, due to the lack of a quality relationship between management and employees. This feeling of disconnectedness may need to be addressed by a human resources program that attempts to boost employee morale. An employee that is satisfied with the organization in which he or she works will be more likely to go that extra step to help the organization reach its mission. This is the direction in which human resource departments will have to develop their skills and direct their attention.

Moss, Jason. "Strategies for recruiting volunteers. A management sub-feature." (2000) Lessons from the Field.
This article is about the failures in recruiting volunteers and the lessons learned by a New Orleans organization called New Orleans Outreach. This organization was set up to offer resources in child development for city kids. People of all ages and ethnicities are welcome to volunteer. The scenario discussed was a recruiting attempt at a parochial high school for girls just outside of New Orleans. The school was 90% white, a majority living in the suburbs. Because of a lack of knowledge going into this recruitment many problems were encountered. For example, for most of the day, instead of talking about the program, the girls of the school were talking about the "really cute guy" giving the lecture. During the lecture the Outreach group used quotes from books, they were unaware, the school had banned. The results were that out of 150 applications taken only one person ended up being a volunteer. While this was not a successful recruiting day, there were lessons to be learned from the experience. First, know your audience. Second, be aware of dynamics relating to age, ethnicity, gender, etc. And finally, avoid skull and crossbones issues, such as quotes from sources that will distance your audience. It is pointed out that learning from your mistakes is very important.

Watad, Mahmoud; Ospina, Sonia. "Integrated managerial training: A program for strategic management development." Public Personnel Management, Summer 1999.
Managerial training programs are designed to include individuals from various levels and functions within an organization. Managerial training is essential when the organization is complex. An example of this type of organization is in the field of health care. To declare quality care in this field requires the ability to manage tasks and resources across horizontal and vertical boundaries. They are strategic because they help develop mechanisms to support horizontal and vertical integration in the organization.

Managerial training programs are designed to include individuals from various levels and functions within an organization. Managerial training is essential when the organization is complex. An example of this type of organization is in the field of health care. To declare quality care in this field requires the ability to manage tasks and resources across horizontal and vertical boundaries. They are strategic because they help develop mechanisms to support horizontal and vertical integration in the organization.

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